OCTOBER 1: Revisiting the tortured foundations of a nation in Kunle Afolayan’s layered totem of neo-Nollywood

Nigerian Cinema has come a long way in the last decade. It has seen blossoming global exposure thanks to streaming, improved aesthetics and a growing sense that it could nail the three pillars of the business of film. The only thing missing is the prestige associated with some of the iconic forbearers of African cinema.Continue reading “OCTOBER 1: Revisiting the tortured foundations of a nation in Kunle Afolayan’s layered totem of neo-Nollywood”

LIONHEART – Nnaji’s tidy debut is unlikely to outgrow its Netflix subplot

The Genevieve Nnaji-directed ‘Lionheart’ opens with the intersection of violence and the mundane I hope a Nigerian filmmaker tackles one day. The eponymous transport company, based in Enugu, is overrun by men demanding payment for helping fill seats in their buses. They troop in with a sense of entitlement roughing up workers as onlookers standContinue reading “LIONHEART – Nnaji’s tidy debut is unlikely to outgrow its Netflix subplot”

FILM REVIEW; OCTOBER 1

Kunle Afolayan’s October 1 arrives in theatres on the back of the Nigerian Independence Day. Much like the day it is set aside to commemorate, October 1 also serves us a paradox of how far we have come but, tellingly, how rooted we are in the murky waters of colonialism. Afolayan’s film uses a latter-day colonialContinue reading “FILM REVIEW; OCTOBER 1”