OCTOBER 1: Revisiting the tortured foundations of a nation in Kunle Afolayan’s layered totem of neo-Nollywood

Nigerian Cinema has come a long way in the last decade. It has seen blossoming global exposure thanks to streaming, improved aesthetics and a growing sense that it could nail the three pillars of the business of film. The only thing missing is the prestige associated with some of the iconic forbearers of African cinema.Continue reading “OCTOBER 1: Revisiting the tortured foundations of a nation in Kunle Afolayan’s layered totem of neo-Nollywood”

THE TRIBUNAL – Maybe it is time to give up on the Kunle Afolayan stock

Where to start with The Tribunal; the bad writing or bad lawyering? I guess one is a function of the other in what is definitely the worst Kunle Afolayan film I’ve seen. The Tribunal has left me fearing the stock I bought in Afolayan, after 2015’s October 1 is maturing into fools’ gold. The films sinceContinue reading “THE TRIBUNAL – Maybe it is time to give up on the Kunle Afolayan stock”

ROTI – Loss, grief and reincarnation according to Afolayan

Nigerian director Kunye Afolayan explores grief and its manifestations in his latest film, Roti. A husband and wife have their son stripped away from them by death in a manner that seems cruelly foreshadowed by the gods. The mother, Diane (Kate Henshaw) has suffered a slew of miscarriages and still births over the course ofContinue reading “ROTI – Loss, grief and reincarnation according to Afolayan”

FILM REVIEW; THE CEO

For the initiated, going into Kunle Afolayan’s The CEO with high hopes is to be expected, owing to his fine work on the Nigerian period piece, October 1. Unfortunately, that means the disappointment is far greater given the end product of Afolayan’s latest offering which proudly wields its pan-African tag but is saddled by a screenplay lacking finesseContinue reading “FILM REVIEW; THE CEO”

FILM REVIEW; OCTOBER 1

Kunle Afolayan’s October 1 arrives in theatres on the back of the Nigerian Independence Day. Much like the day it is set aside to commemorate, October 1 also serves us a paradox of how far we have come but, tellingly, how rooted we are in the murky waters of colonialism. Afolayan’s film uses a latter-day colonialContinue reading “FILM REVIEW; OCTOBER 1”